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Computing & Business

Computing and Business Faculty

Mr D Bennett- bennettd@denbigh.net
Miss A Brown- browna@denbigh.net
Mr S Hoare- hoares@denbigh.net
Mr S Hussain- hussains@denbigh.net
Mrs A Moody- moodya@denbigh.net
Mr A Steed- steeda@denbigh.net
Mr N Umney- umneyn@denbigh.net Ms A Collins – collinsam@denbigh.net Mrs S Moussa – moussas@denbigh.net Mr B Rosie – rosiew@denbigh.net Mr J Lee – leejo@denbigh.net

Business

The Computing and Business Faculty comprises the subjects of Computing, Information Technologies, Business, Enterprise & Marketing & Economics.

In Business, students in Year 9 to 11 will follow the OCR Business GCSE or the vocational Enterprise & Marketing Cambridge National qualification.  In the Sixth Form they will follow Edexcel A Level Business.  In Computing and Information Technologies, students in Year 9 to 11 will follow the OCR GCSE Computer Science or the vocational Cambridge National Information Technologies course.  In the Sixth Form they will follow AQA A-Level Computer Science.

Members of the Faculty contribute to running after school clubs to help develop Information Technologies skills and confidence as well as helping students to complete projects and coursework.

Schemes of Learning

Each faculty has developed a Scheme of Learning for each subject and year group. The Schemes of Learning outline the curriculum journey that students will embark on each academic year.

Computer Science

Digital Literacy

Information Technology

Business

Enterprise & Marketing

BTEC Travel and Toruism

Financial Studies

Macroeconomics

Microeconomics

Key Words for Year 7 Computing – Summer

Key termDefinition
Volatile / Non-VolatileVolatile means the storage and memory requires power to keep the data, non-volatile means the data and programs are not lost when the power is switched off.
Random Access MemoryRAM – used to store data and programs currently in use. It is volatile.
Read Only memoryROM – Stores the start-up instructions for our devices, and the operating system in very small computers like the ones in a washing machine.
Input DeviceAllows a user to enter instructions and data into the computer. Examples include: Keyboard, mouse, webcam, microphone.
Output deviceAllows the computer to see the result of processing. Examples include: Monitor (screen), printer, speakers.
Storage deviceThese are non-volatile places to keep the data and programs we use safe. We save our work into storage devices. Examples include hard disk drive, CD / DVD, solid state drive, USB Memory Stick.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)This is the part of the computer than executes all the instructions in the computer programs.
Operating SystemThe (large) piece of software which controls the operation of the computer and all the devices connected to it.
Personal DataData / Information which can be used to identify a single person, e.g. name, address, phone number, school, height and many others.
ProgrammingWriting instructions for a computer to follow, to solve a problem. When writing our programs we need to consider: SequenceSelection Iteration.
SequenceSequence is ensuring that the program instructions are arranged in an order that we solve the problem.
SelectionSelection is deciding which parts of the computer program will be executed (run) depending on a decision. For example: if age greater than 17 then: print(“You can learn to drive”) else: print(“You can’t drive yet”).
IterationIteration means repeating something. For a program this usually means performing a series of program instructions many times over. For Example: For number in range(1,11): print(number, “Times 5 =“, number * 5) End For This will cause the computer to print out the 5 times table.
Bits and BytesComputer scientists measure the size of something in terms of bits and bytes. There are 8 bits in one byte. There are about 1000 (actually 1024) bytes in one kilobyte (kb). There are about 1000 (1024) kilobytes in one megabyte.   bit, nibble (4 bits), byte, kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, terabyte Remember: Big Kits Make Great Tents!

Key Words for Year 8 Computing – Summer

Key TermDefinition
Volatile / Non-VolatileVolatile means the storage and memory requires power to keep the data, non-volatile means the data and programs are not lost when the power is switched off.
Random Access MemoryRAM – used to store data and programs currently in use. It is volatile.
Read Only memoryROM – Stores the start-up instructions for our devices, and the operating system in very small computers like the ones in a washing machine.
Input DeviceAllows a user to enter instructions and data into the computer. Examples include: Keyboard, mouse, webcam, microphone.
Output deviceAllows the computer to see the result of processing. Examples include: Monitor (screen), printer, speakers.
Storage deviceThese are non-volatile places to keep the data and programs we use safe. We save our work into storage devices. Examples include hard disk drive, CD / DVD, solid state drive, USB Memory Stick.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)This is the part of the computer than executes all the instructions in the computer programs.
Operating SystemThe (large) piece of software which controls the operation of the computer and all the devices connected to it.
Personal DataData / Information which can be used to identify a single person, e.g. name, address, phone number, school, height and many others.
ProgrammingWriting instructions for a computer to follow, to solve a problem. When writing our programs we need to consider: SequenceSelection Iteration.
SequenceSequence is ensuring that the program instructions are arranged in an order that we solve the problem.
SelectionSelection is deciding which parts of the computer program will be executed (run) depending on a decision. For example: if age greater than 17 then: print(“You can learn to drive”) else: print(“You can’t drive yet”).
IterationIteration means repeating something. For a program this usually means performing a series of program instructions many times over. For Example: For number in range(1,11): print(number, “Times 5 =“, number * 5) End For This will cause the computer to print out the 5 times table.
Bits and BytesComputer scientists measure the size of something in terms of bits and bytes. There are 8 bits in one byte. There are about 1000 (actually 1024) bytes in one kilobyte (kb). There are about 1000 (1024) kilobytes in one megabyte.   bit, nibble (4 bits), byte, kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, terabyte Remember: Big Kits Make Great Tents!