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Creative Arts

Creative Arts Faculty

Ms S Bohannon- bohannons@denbigh.net
Mrs L Clegg- cleggl@denbigh.net
Mr S Frost- frosts@denbigh.net
Miss H Ings- ingsh@denbigh.net
Mr M Jackson- jacksonm@denbigh.net
Miss C O’rourke- orourkec@denbigh.net
Miss E Tattam- tattame@denbigh.net
Mr D Wilkie- wilkied@denbigh.ne

Faculty Information

The Creative Arts Faculty is a hive of energy and imagination, and our committed team of staff offer inclusive opportunities for all students to engage in creative pursuits both inside and outside of lessons.

We are fortunate to have exceptional facilities.  We have three open-plan art rooms on the top floor complete with storage and a kiln.  Downstairs we have a purpose-built ‘Meeting Hall’ which is split into two spaces, with a moveable partition.  We use both spaces as drama classrooms, with a range of impressive audio-visual equipment and storage space.  We have two music classrooms, one of which includes bi-fold doors leading to an outdoor performance space, ‘the amphitheatre’ where audiences can watch our break time concerts on the stone steps.  We also have a dedicated Music Technology room with a suite of computers with digital audio workstations.  We have an instrument storage space and three music practice rooms primarily used by peripatetic teachers during the School day.

We feel very strongly that our extra-curricular opportunities should be inclusive and are there for all members of our Denbigh community, regardless of whether they have opted to study Creative Arts subjects at examination level.   We regularly refresh our offers and encourage students to set up their own clubs and rehearsals. A few examples of our regular clubs are Musical Theatre, Art, Band Development, Orchestra, and an A-Capella singing group.

The Faculty also presents larger productions. In the last two years, our students have performed ‘Matilda the Musical’ by special commission and license from the Royal Shakespeare Company, entered the Shakespeare Schools Festival performing ‘Julius Caesar’; performed a sell-out production of ‘We Will Rock You’ complete with live band; put on a production of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, and performed an intimate thrust version of the play, ‘DNA’ by Dennis Kelly.

The Creative Arts Faculty at Denbigh is a bustling environment where you will find students rehearsing, and working outside of classroom hours regularly and you will find staff committed to realising students’ potential in their creative endeavours.

Art

Art is all around you.  From the moment you pick up your smartphone and see a wallpaper image on your screen of a decorative pattern, a character design, a painting by a famous artist, a photograph you have taken, you are bombarded with the formal elements of art.  The wallpaper (or coloured paint) on the walls, the statue in the front room, the poster on the side of the bus.  Prevalent throughout history, Art is seen in ways many people cannot imagine.  Cultures use mud to create masks; artists paint a gigantic apple squeezed into a tiny room; an everyday soup can or bottle of coke can be called Art.

In Art lessons, we want all students to experience Art from around the world, both historic and contemporary.  To see that picking up a pencil and drawing with it is Art, but that drawing can also be in colour, with a pen, with a spatula and glue and with a finger dipped in paint.  We want all students to be encouraged by experimentation and not be afraid to have a go at something new and take risks.  Students are always encouraged to be analytical about the work of others and critical (and complimentary) of their own.  We know that Art will always be a part of our diverse society and our creative industries, and we believe it is something to be really excited about.

Key Words for Year 7 Art – Spring

Key TermDefinition
Manipulation of a materialControl of a certain material (card) including cutting, layering and joining.
CompositionThe placement/ arrangement/ layout of different elements in a piece of art.
ColourReflected light on an object.
ContrastThe use of opposite elements (light and dark, smooth and textured, large and small).
ShapeTwo dimensional (flat).
FormThree dimensional (with depth).
Formal elementsParts that make up art including line, tone, shape, form.
Art movementsCertain styles of art across periods of time both historical and modern.
Artist linksLooking at the work of others to inspire your own.
SymbolismThe emphasis on emotion, feelings and ideas in an image.

Key Words for Year 8 Art – Spring

Key TermDefinition
Cultural identityBelonging to a group including history, use of art, language, visuals, beliefs.
AlebrijesSpirit animals within the ‘Day of the Dead’ celebrations.
PSHEThe relationship between people including personal, social, health and beliefs.
ScaleThe size a piece of art could be.
Contemporary artModern art and styles, techniques.
Careers in artLooking at the work of PIXAR and the process of creating an animated feature.
AnnotationUsing key words and phrases to explore and explain ideas presented.
InvestigationLooking into a theme in detail considering use of different sources of information.

Year 7

Autumn 1st half termTone and Texture
Autumn 2nd half termTone and Texture
Spring 1st half termPattern
Spring 2nd half termPattern
Summer 1st half termColour Theory
Summer 2nd half termColour Theory

Year 8

Autumn 1st half termAfrican Culture
Autumn 2nd half termAfrican Culture
Spring 1st half termMexican Day of the Dead/Coco
Spring 2nd half termMexican Day of the Dead/Coco
Summer 1st half termPortraiture
Summer 2nd half termPortraiture

Year 9

Autumn 1st half termNatural Forms
Autumn 2nd half termMan Made objects
Spring 1st half termStill life final outcome
Spring 2nd half termThe Coast
Summer 1st half termThe Coast
Summer 2nd half termThe Coast final outcome/Cultural Identity introduction

Year 10

Autumn 1st half termCultural Identity
Autumn 2nd half termCultural Identity
Spring 1st half termCultural Identity final outcome
Spring 2nd half termContrast
Summer 1st half termContrast
Summer 2nd half termContrast final outcome/Personal Expression introduction

Year 11

Autumn 1st half termPersonal Expression
Autumn 2nd half termPersonal Expression
Spring 1st half termPersonal Expression final outcome/Exam briefs released
Spring 2nd half termExam Preparation
Summer 1st half termExamination
Summer 2nd half termN\A

Year 12

Autumn 1st half termBuilt Environment
Autumn 2nd half termBuilt Environment
Spring 1st half termBuilt Environment final outcome
Spring 2nd half termAge
Summer 1st half termAge
Summer 2nd half termAge final outcome/Personal project introduction

Year 13

Autumn 1st half termPersonal Project
Autumn 2nd half termPersonal Project/Written Element
Spring 1st half termPersonal project final outcome/Exam briefs released
Spring 2nd half termExam Preparation
Summer 1st half termExam
Summer 2nd half termN\A

Drama

Drama lessons at Denbigh encourage creativity, imagination and teach Drama as a discreet body of knowledge, in addition to acknowledging its wide range of transferable skills.  The three key areas of learning in Drama are performing script, devising drama, and evaluating and analysing others’ performances.  All three areas are taught throughout our curriculum in Year 7 all the way through to Year 13 in A Level study.

Students learn about effective communication for an audience in terms of physical and vocal acting skills. The students will then build upon this foundation and learn about different styles of theatre from physical theatre, melodrama, epic theatre, naturalism and develop performance skills to suit these styles. Students will perform scripts in particular styles and then devise their own drama, inspired by a range of stimuli, and use style and theatre practitioners to develop their work.  Students will evaluate one another’s work verbally and then develop to writing extended analytical reviews of professional live theatre.

Our facilities support the teaching of Theatre Design and students are introduced to this from Year 7 in addition to developing their performance skills. Drama offers a creative environment for experimentation and an opportunity to explore the lives of a range of different characters, places, and time periods.

Keywords for Year 7 Drama (Greek Theatre & Antigone) – Spring

WordDefinition
Greek theatreTheatre that was created by the Ancient Greek people around 700 BC.
StageIn Greek theatre, the stage was originally made of wood; later it was made of stone.
SkeneA hut behind the stage where actors could change costume. It would also have scenery painted on the outside.
MekhaneThe crane that was used to suspend actors when they were playing Gods or flying mythical creatures.
OrkhestraThe large area in front of the stage where the chorus would perform.
ChorusA group of actors who would comment on the action of the play often through movement and song.
MasksActors (all men at this time) wore masks in addition to their costume so they could play many characters. Masks helped to show the audience right at the back who each character was and how they felt.
SophoclesA famous Greek playwright who wrote the play Antigone.
AmphitheatreAn outdoors performance space where Greek plays would have been performed.
Choral speakingSpeech by a group of voices (a chorus) who use different techniques to communicate the meaning of the words.
UnisonSpeech, or movement, that is performed at the same time by more than one performer.
CanonSpeech, or movement, that is performed by one person and then repeated by the next, and then by the next. A line or movement performed one after another.

Keywords for Year 7 Drama (Introduction to Theatre Design) – Spring

WordDefinition
CostumeThe items of clothing that actors wear on stage that are designed for specific characters.
FabricThe material that a costume is made from.
TextureThe feel of the material that the costume is made from.
Lighting designThe lighting that has been chosen to support the action on stage.
GelA coloured piece of plastic that changes the colour of the lighting e.g. a green gel.
GoboA stencil through which light shines to create a specific shape on stage e.g. prison bars gobo.
Staging formsThe types of staging that can be used.
End onThe audience sits on one side facing the actors eg the Denbigh Meeting Hall.
Traverse  The audience sits on two sides facing one another with the actors in the middle eg like a catwalk.
Thrust  The audience sits on three sides with the stage shaped like a T.
In the roundThe audience sits all around the stage often on four sides of a square or a circle.
Sound designThe sounds, live or recorded, that have been chosen to support the action on stage.
Sound cue sheetThe instructions given to the sound operator so they can play the sounds on stage at the correct time.
PropsShortened word for the phrase ‘theatrical properties’. Small items that actors bring onto the stage and use.

Keywords for Year 8 Drama (Epic Theatre) – Spring

Key TermDefinition
Epic TheatreA type of non-naturalistic performance which has a main feature of communicating a moral, social, or political message to the audience.
Episodic StructureA structure of a play where scenes are self-contained. They could be performed in any order but all join together with the main message being communicated. This structure ensures that the audience don’t get too emotionally attached to the characters on stage and they focus on the message instead.
Breaking the fourth wallWhere there is no separation between actors and audience. Everyone knows they are watching a play and the actors can interact with the audience.
Direct AddressActors speaking directly to the audience – usually through the broken fourth wall.
StereotypeA character communicated to the audience with recognisable features so they can tell who they are immediately. This is particularly important when actors are multi-roling and the audience need to know who they are playing instantly.
JuxtapositionA juxtaposition is a contrast, usually complete opposites, presented next to each other in a performance for the purposes of making the audience think. Eg – No Man’s Land – bodies of dead and wounded on stage will images of war recruitment propaganda posters are being displayed and read in an enthusiastic tone.
NarrationAn actor, usually through direct address, tells the audience the plot of the scene, or the play. They might also comment upon the action on stage giving an opinion. Narration reminds the audience that they are watching a play and focusses them on the message of the performance.
PlacardSigns that are held up by actors to give additional information to the audience: a location, a comment on the action, or a rhetorical question.
ThrustA staging form where the audience sit on three sides of the stage. This enables direct address between actors and audience.
Bertolt BrechtGerman playwright and theatre practitioner who is well known for writing plays in a non-naturalistic, Epic Theatre style.
Multi rolingAn actor playing more than one part in a performance.

Key Words for Year 8 Drama (Naturalism) – Spring

WordDefinition
Konstantin StanislavskiA Russian theatre actor and director who created a system for becoming a more truthful and believable actor.
End onThe staging form where the audience sit on one side of the stage directly in front of the actors. The Denbigh Meeting Hall is an end on stage.
Proscenium ArchThis is the frame which surrounds the stage space, in an end on staging form. The arch separates the audience from the stage and is usually decorative and ornate. It is appropriate for naturalistic plays.
NaturalismTheatre performances which aim to create an illusion of reality. The audience should feel that the performance is truthful and believable.
Circles of attentionThis is the actor’s awareness of where their attention is being addressed. Circles of attention are achieved through the actor’s focus and concentration.
Off-stage lifeAn improvisation method to consider your character in a situation outside the pages of the script. This helps you to develop an understanding of the character and how they act in a range of situations.
Emotion memoryAn actor uses a real past experience where they felt a similar emotion to that of a character they are playing. They can borrow these feelings from real life and apply them to the performance.
Units and ObjectivesA play text is split into units of action and each unit needs an objective: what does the character want to achieve in this section.
Given circumstancesThis is the information given about a character by the playwright in the script. They are facts which cannot be changed (age, occupation, relationship to other characters) and from knowing these facts, you build your characterisation.
Imagination/ ‘Magic If’An actor asking themselves, “what would I do if I was in this situation?” This makes the actor put themselves in their character’s shoes making them understand the motivations of the character.

Year 7

Autumn 1st half termCommunicating Meaning
Autumn 2nd half termCommunicating Meaning
Spring 1st half termAntigone and Greek Theatre
Spring 2nd half termDesign elements
Summer 1st half termPhysical Theatre
Summer 2nd half termDevising Drama

Year 8

Autumn 1st half termTension
Autumn 2nd half termEpic Theatre
Spring 1st half termEpic Theatre
Spring 2nd half termNaturalism
Summer 1st half termDevising Drama
Summer 2nd half termDevising Drama

Year 9

Autumn 1st half termStyle and Genre Devising
Autumn 2nd half termStyle and Genre Devising
Spring 1st half termMock scripted practical
Spring 2nd half termMock scripted practical
Summer 1st half termWritten exam – study of set text
Summer 2nd half termWritten exam – study of set text

Year 10

Autumn 1st half termDevising techniques, style, genre and practitioner
Autumn 2nd half termStimuli booklet released from exam board
Devising Drama 30% NEA
Spring 1st half termDevising Drama 30% NEA
Spring 2nd half termDevising Drama 30% NEA
Summer 1st half termPresenting and Performing Texts 30%
Summer 2nd half termPresenting and Performing Texts 30%

Year 11

Autumn 1st half termWritten exam – study of set text and Play Review
Autumn 2nd half termWritten exam – study of set text and Play Review
Spring 1st half termPresenting and Performing Texts 30%
Spring 2nd half termPresenting and Performing Texts 30%
Summer 1st half termWritten exam revision
Summer 2nd half termN/A

Year 12

Autumn 1st half termIntroduction to theatre practitioners
Component 1 – Study of set text one
Autumn 2nd half termComponent 2 – Devising Drama
Component 1 – Study of set text one
Spring 1st half termComponent 2 – Devising Drama
Component 1 – Study of set text one
Spring 2nd half termComponent 2 – Devising Drama
Component 3 Workshop scripted extract 1
Summer 1st half termComponent 3 Workshop scripted extracts 1 and 2 and written Reflective Report 
Summer 2nd half termComponent 1 Study of set text two
Component 3 Workshop scripted extracts 1 and 2 and written Reflective Report

Year 13

Autumn 1st half termComponent 3 – performance of scripted extract 3 and Reflective Report
Autumn 2nd half termComponent 3 – performance of scripted extract 3 and Reflective Report
Spring 1st half termComponent 1 – written exam revision
Spring 2nd half termComponent 1 – written exam revision
Summer 1st half termComponent 1 – written exam revision
Summer 2nd half termN/A

Music

Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. The high quality music education at Denbigh engages and inspires pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As students progress, they develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical world.

At Denbigh we have curated exciting and engaging schemes of work for all year groups that cover a broad range of experiences, musical backgrounds and cultures, and allows students to build their performance, composition, and appraisal skills, as well as their personal discipline and independence, creativity, collaborative group working skills, respect for others, and self-esteem through personal accomplishment.

Key Words for Year 7 Music – Spring

Key TermDefinition
HOOKA ‘musical hook’ is usually the ‘catchy bit’ of the song that you will remember. It is often short and used and repeated in different places throughout the piece. HOOKS can either a: MELODIC HOOK – a HOOK based on the instruments and the singers; a RHYTHMIC HOOK – a HOOK based on the patterns in the drums and bass parts or a VERBAL/LYRICAL HOOK – a HOOK based on the rhyming and/or repeated words of the chorus.
RIFFA repeated musical pattern often used in the introduction and instrumental breaks in a song or piece of music. RIFFS can be rhythmic, melodic or lyrical, short and repeated.
OSTINATOA repeated musical pattern. The same meaning as the word RIFF, but used when describing repeated musical patterns in “classical” and some “World” music.
BASS LINEThe lowest pitched part of the music often played on bass instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass. RIFFS are often used in BASS LINES.
MELODYThe main ‘tune’ of a song or piece of music, played higher in pitch that the BASS LINE and it may also contain RIFFS or HOOKS. In ‘Classical Music’, the melody line is often performed ‘with’ an OSTINATO pattern below.
REPEAT SYMBOLA musical symbol used in staff notation consisting of two vertical dots followed by double bar lines showing the performer should go back to either the start of the piece or to the corresponding sign facing the other way and repeat that section of music.
TREBLE CLEFA musical symbol showing that notes are to be performed at a higher pitch.
BASS CLEFA musical symbol showing that notes are to be performed at a lower pitch. The BASS LINE part is often written using the BASS CLEF.
PITCHThe highness or lowness of a sound or musical note.
MELODY/THEMEThe main ‘tune’ of a song or piece of music. The melody or theme often varies in pitch and ‘good melodies’ have an organised and recognisable shape.
HARMONYPlaying two or more notes at the same time. The ‘harmony part’ in music is always different to the melody part.
DRONEA repeated note or notes of long duration played throughout the music. When two notes are used, they are often five notes apart (a fifth).
FORM/STRUCTUREHow a piece of music is organised into different sections or parts. PHRASE – A short section of music, like a ‘musical sentence’.
QUESTION AND ANSWER PHRASESTwo short sections within a larger/longer piece of music. The first QUESTION PHRASE is followed by the ANSWER PHRASE which in some way copies or answers the first – like a ‘musical conversation’.
BINARY FORM (AB)Describes music in two separate sections. The first section is labelled ‘A’ and the second section labelled ‘B’ – either or both sections may be repeated. The ‘B’ section contrasts musically in some way to the first ‘A’ section.
TERNARY FORM (ABA)Describes music in three sections. The first section can be labelled ‘A’ and the second section ‘B’. The ‘B’ section contrasts in some way to the first ‘A’ section which is then REPEATED after the ‘B’ section again making a ‘musical sandwich’.
RONDO FORM (ABACADA….)Describes music where a main THEME or MELODY ‘A’ keeps returning between different contrasting sections ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’. etc called EPISODES.

Key Words for Year 8 Music – Spring

Key TermDefinition
HOOKA ‘musical hook’ is usually the ‘catchy bit’ of the song that you will remember. It is often short and used and repeated in different places throughout the piece. HOOKS can either a: MELODIC HOOK – a HOOK based on the instruments and the singers; a RHYTHMIC HOOK – a HOOK based on the patterns in the drums and bass parts or a VERBAL/LYRICAL HOOK – a HOOK based on the rhyming and/or repeated words of the chorus.
RIFFA repeated musical pattern often used in the introduction and instrumental breaks in a song or piece of music. RIFFS can be rhythmic, melodic or lyrical, short and repeated.
OSTINATOA repeated musical pattern. The same meaning as the word RIFF, but used when describing repeated musical patterns in ‘classical’ and some ‘World’ music.
BASS LINEThe lowest pitched part of the music often played on bass instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass. RIFFS are often used in BASS LINES.
MELODYThe main ‘tune’ of a song or piece of music, played higher in pitch that the BASS LINE and it may also contain RIFFS or HOOKS. In ‘Classical Music’, the melody line is often performed ‘with’ an OSTINATO pattern below.
REPEAT SYMBOLA musical symbol used in staff notation consisting of two vertical dots followed by double bar lines showing the performer should go back to either the start of the piece or to the corresponding sign facing the other way and repeat that section of music.
TREBLE CLEFA musical symbol showing that notes are to be performed at a higher pitch.
BASS CLEFA musical symbol showing that notes are to be performed at a lower pitch. The BASS LINE part is often written using the BASS CLEF.
PITCHThe highness or lowness of a sound or musical note.
MELODY/THEMEThe main ‘tune’ of a song or piece of music. The melody or theme often varies in pitch and ‘good melodies’ have an organised and recognisable shape.
HARMONYPlaying two or more notes at the same time. The ‘harmony part’ in music is always different to the melody part.
DRONEA repeated note or notes of long duration played throughout the music. When two notes are used, they are often five notes apart (a fifth).
FORM/STRUCTUREHow a piece of music is organised into different sections or parts. PHRASE – A short section of music, like a ‘musical sentence’.
QUESTION AND ANSWER PHRASESTwo short sections within a larger/longer piece of music. The first QUESTION PHRASE is followed by the ANSWER PHRASE which in some way copies or answers the first – like a ‘musical conversation’.
BINARY FORM (AB)Describes music in two separate sections. The first section is labelled ‘A’ and the second section labelled ‘B’ – either or both sections may be repeated. The ‘B’ section contrasts musically in some way to the first ‘A’ section.
TERNARY FORM (ABA)Describes music in three sections. The first section can be labelled ‘A’ and the second section ‘B’. The ‘B’ section contrasts in some way to the first ‘A’ section which is then REPEATED after the ‘B’ section again making a ‘musical sandwich’.
RONDO FORM (ABACADA….)Describes music where a main THEME or MELODY ‘A’ keeps returning between different contrasting sections ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’. etc called EPISODES.

Year 7

Autumn 1st half termElements of Music
Autumn 2nd half termKeyboard Skills
Spring 1st half termI’ve got rhythm
Spring 2nd half termHooks and Riffs
Summer 1st half termForm and structure
Summer 2nd half termInstruments of the Orchestra

Year 8

Autumn 1st half termSamba
Autumn 2nd half termBlues and Jazz
Spring 1st half termComputer Game Music
Spring 2nd half termPopular Music
Summer 1st half termMinimalism
Summer 2nd half termMusic for Film and Television

Year 9

Autumn 1st half termMusic Theory
Autumn 2nd half termSolo performance
Spring 1st half termBrandenburg Concerto
Spring 2nd half termPiano Sonata
Summer 1st half termIntroduction to Composition
Summer 2nd half termEnsemble Performance

Year 10

Autumn 1st half termMusic for Stage and Screen
Autumn 2nd half termFusions
Spring 1st half termFusions wider listening
Spring 2nd half termMusic for Stage and Screen
Summer 1st half termFree Composition
Summer 2nd half termComposition

Year 11

Autumn 1st half termSet works revision
Autumn 2nd half termSet works revision
Spring 1st half termComposition
Spring 2nd half termPerformance
Summer 1st half termExam Revision
Summer 2nd half termN/A

Music Technology

Music Technology is the study of creating music using technology.  Whilst studying this subject, students will learn about using music production software and equipment, musical styles, the history and development of technology and the principles and practices of Music Technology.  Modern music and media rely on the effective use of Music Technology which makes the subject both exciting and rewarding to study. 

During Years 7 and 8, the music curriculum will explore some of the basic elements of technology with occasional opportunities to work with computers and music.  When students make their GCSE option choices, they can choose the VCert Music Technology course as one of their options.  This course explores the foundation skills of Music Technology through the completion of portfolios of work and examinations.  If students choose to continue into our Sixth Form, we offer the Edexcel Music Technology A Level course.  The A level covers a broad range of knowledge and skills and is the perfect stepping stone for students who wish to continue studying Music Technology into further education.

Year 9

Autumn 1st half termIntroduction to Cubase
Autumn 2nd half termMusic Technology hardware
Spring 1st half termCreating a piece of music in a particular style
Spring 2nd half termMixing project
Summer 1st half termHealth & Safety
Summer 2nd half termSound Design Project

Year 10

Autumn 1st half termPortfolio 1 – Hardware and software
Autumn 2nd half termPortfolio 2 – practical
Spring 1st half termMusical genres and elements of music
Spring 2nd half termPortfolio 2 – practical
Summer 1st half termPortfolio 2 – practical and exam preparation
Summer 2nd half termPortfolio 2 – practical and recording skills

Year 11

Autumn 1st half termPlanning for recording
Autumn 2nd half termPortfolio 3 – practical recording
Spring 1st half termMixing skills and sound creation
Spring 2nd half termPortfolio 4 – Sound creation and exam preparation
Summer 1st half termPortfolio 4 – Sound creation and exam preparation
Summer 2nd half termN/A

Year 12

Autumn 1st half termRecording and Composing
Autumn 2nd half termRecording and Composing
Spring 1st half termAdvanced mixing and compositional skills
Spring 2nd half termAdvanced mixing practice task and extended composition practise project
Summer 1st half termExtended recording practice and extended composition practise
Summer 2nd half termDrum recording skills and explore A Level set briefs